My Genealogical Threes

Randy Seaver at GeneaMusing posed a My Genealogical Threes topic for SNGF or weekend genealogical fun. So here we go:

Three genealogical libraries I frequent:
Since I live in Pullman and work full time, my library visits are virtual… but very successful nonetheless:
> Family History Library with resources via my local Family History Center
> America’s libraries via Interlibrary loan at WSU Libraries,  a helpful, low-cost service for which I am grateful
> GoogleBooks, an extraordinary genealogy “library” [also books at Heritage Quest and Ancestry.com]

Three places I’ve visited on genealogy trips:
> Benjamin Church House, now in Shorewood, built by my third great-grandfather and Milwaukee pioneer in the 1840s.
> Milwaukee, Wisconsin, my hometown but unappreciated from a genealogy standpoint until recently
> New Holstein, Wisconsin, where my ancestors from Bremen and Schleswig-Holstein settled in the 1850s.

Three ancestral places I want to visit:
> Litchfield & Guilford, Connecticut – Bradley
> Hodnet & Prees, Shropshire, England – Booth, Ebrey
> Wewelsfleth, Holstein, Germany – Tonner, von Thun, Suhr, Witt, Rossman, Stindt, Sommer, other ancestors

Three genealogy societies I belong to (or want to):
I list one historical society because they often offer invaluable assistance to genealogists as well:
> New Holstein Historical Society – Wisconsin
> Ulster County Genealogical Society - New York
> New England Historic Genealogical Society

Three websites that help my research:
> Ancestry.com
> Links to the Past - for Milwaukee County
> Calumet County Genealogy & History - for New Holstein

Three ancestral graves that I’ve visited (or want to)
> Boie Monument
- New Holstein, Wisconsin
> Hachez Monument - New Holstein, Wisconsin
> Church Monument , Forest Home – Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Three brickwall ancestors I want to research more
> Jane Ebrey - my gg-grandmother, b. abt 1839 in Shropshire, need to confirm her parents, said to be Thomas and Anne Ebrey
> Hannah Baker Church, b. 4 March 1773, Ulster County, NY, my fourth great-grandmother who became a Quaker minister, wife of Caleb and mother of 10. Parents unknown.
> Caleb Church, b. abt. 1772, possibly in Dutchess County, NY, my fourth great-grandfather, said to be descended from Richard Church of Plymouth, Mass., but unproven.

Other answers to this fun challenge have been posted by:
> Thomas MacEntee
> Randy Seaver
> and many more here!

This is one in a series of genealogy and family history research articles to help you find your family and ancestors, often for modest or no cost. Please follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/BBPetura

Twitter for Genealogy

If you are not yet using Twitter for genealogy, now is the time to start. And the cool aspect of Twitter is that you can use it to connect with family, friends and folks in your other hobby interests all at the same time. And all in 140 character micro-blog posts called “tweets” that make connecting quick and easy.

So how can you possibly learn very much in 140-character postings about genealogy or family history? The key is to combine a sentence or meaningful phrase with a link to a Web site that might be your blog or genealogy resources you recommend.

You’ll get many ideas for research from other genealogists on Twitter. You’ll enjoy other researchers’ success stories or learn of their brickwalls. Today Dick Eastman shared his success story using DNA to confirm his connection to the Roger Eastman who arrived in Massachusetts in 1638.

And you’ll get updates on genealogy news. The new genealogy social network called GenealogyWise was out on Twitter from the day it was available to join — and spurred a flood of new members. [Meet me via my page at GenealogyWise.]

One helpful resource that Twitter genealogists share are listings of top or favorite family history research tools and Web sites. One individual just shared the list of 89 Genealogy Resources at the well known RefDesk site. While many of the resources are well known, there’s bound to be something new to help my research. And perhaps yours as well.

And you can participate in Surname Saturday, posting the surnames you’re researching and where they were from, to connect with others researching to same names.

To get started, head over to http://twitter.com/ and click on Get Started – Join! Choose a user name [it will appear in all of your tweets] and password. Then join the fun, finding others on Twitter to “follow” to get their messages.

I post about geneaology and family history, so would love to have you follow me at  http://twitter.com/BBPetura.

Then use the Twitter advanced search here that you can find here: http://search.twitter.com/advanced and put the word genealogy in the space called Hashtag. Up will come all the recent “tweets” about the subject that have #genealogy in them.  You also can search using the #familyhistory hashtag.

Pick a few folks to follow by clicking on their name — and then click the Follow box under their picture. Your home page will immediately have the most recent messages from everyone you follow. Enjoy reading and then posting ideas and resources you want to share. Soon you’ll have some people following you too. Enjoy!

This is one in a series of genealogy and family history research articles to help you find your family and ancestors, often for modest or no cost.

Favorite Genealogy Books

Who better to ask about favorite genealogy books than the genealogists who share ideas via Twitter? Here are the first answers to come in, along with the poll and my own answer:

POLL: What is your favorite genealogy book & why? If you’ll reply via Twitter I’ll compile the recommendations and post them online @ http://tiny.cc/RelMusing

Somerset Homecoming is a favorite of mine. The author researched a communiity once enslaved on Somerset Plantation. See whose favorite this is:  http://twitter.com/AYWalton

Family Chronicle books: 500 Brickwall Solutions to Genealogy Problems & More Brickwall Solutions Many ideas to try!  Favorites of:  http://twitter.com/mdiane_rogers 

Fave genealogy book is The Family Tree Problem Solver by M. H. Rising, will probably be Pro Genealogy by E. S. Mills (when I finish).  Favorites of:  http://twitter.com/MichaelHait

Land & Property Research in the U.S. by E. Wade Hone, et al. has been so useful & informative in much of my genealogy research. This is a favorite of: http://twitter.com/FamilyStories

So many favorites! Google Your Family Tree and ProGen rank near the top of my list though, after personal family genealogies. These are favorites of: http://twitter.com/rcurious

My fav genealogy book is The Sleuth Book for Genealogists by Emily Croom because I love solving family history mysteries with clues! This is a favorite of:  http://twitter.com/BBPetura

We’ll expand the list as more nominations arrive! Thanks to all who contributed ideas right away!

Barbara / http://twitter.com/BBPetura

Published in: on May 12, 2009 at 3:49 am  Comments (1)  
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Top 10 Genealogy Sites

Randy Seaver, who writes the blog called Geneamusings posed a Saturday night genealogy project for fun. He writes: “Let’s do a Top Ten list of Favorite Genealogy Web Sites. These can be record databases, data portals, how-to sites, family trees, software, entertainment, blogs, etc.”

So here are the top ten sites that helped my research:

1 – Ancestry.com - many databases of info, use it all the time
2 – FamilySearch – IGI,  Ancestral File, more helpful here, as well as access to the Family History Library catalog
3 – RootsWeb - helpful researcher contributions
4 – GoogleBooks – many old and valuable family lineage & family history books online
5 – Heritage Quest - census, family books, PERSI, Revolutionary War Pension records. Get free log in from your library
6 – CastleGarden.org - many immigrant ancestors arriving before Ellis Island can be found here, upgrade coming soon
7 – GenForums – great place for queries for surnames, locations
8 – USGenWeb – especially the individual counties posting vital, census and cemetery records, more
9 – Wisconsin Vital Records - marriage records link people born same county, same day, suggesting possible spouses
10 – Milwaukee County Links to the Past - diverse resources on city’s people, family, genealogy resources

Doing genealogy is like doing jigsaw puzzles and requires pieces of each person’s puzzle from different sources. That’s the challenge and the fascination!

Here are several genealogy guides that I have created :

> Brickwall Genealogy Resources
> Finding Family for Free index of postings that are found on my genealogy blog called Relative Musings.

You can see Randy’s top 10 list on his post for May 2, 2009. Go to his blog and add a post with your list — or post it online and create a link on this blog page.

Enjoy!

Published in: on May 3, 2009 at 12:42 am  Leave a Comment  
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